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  Interpersonal skills involve the ability to communicate and build relationships with others. Often called “people skills,” they tend to incorporate both your innate personality traits and how you’ve learned to handle certain social situations. Effective interpersonal skills can help you during the job interview process and can have a positive impact on your career advancement. What are interpersonal skills? Interpersonal skills are traits you rely on when you interact and communicate with others. They cover a variety of scenarios where communication and cooperation are essential. Some examples of interpersonal skills include: Active listening Teamwork Responsibility Dependability Leadership Motivation Flexibility Patience Empathy In a work environment, strong interpersonal skills are an asset that can help you navigate complexity, change and day-to-day tasks. Why are interpersonal skills important? Strong interpersonal skills can help you during the job interview process as interviewers look for applicants who can work well with others. They will also help you succeed in almost any job by helping you understand other people and adjusting your approach to work together effectively. For example, while a software engineer may spend the majority of her time working on code independently, she may need to collaborate with other programmers to effectively bring a product to market. This is especially true as more companies implement collaborative agile frameworks for getting work done. Employers will be looking for workers who can both perform technical tasks with excellence and communicate well with colleagues. Interpersonal skills examples Unlike technical or “hard” skills, interpersonal skills are “soft” skills that are easily transferable across industries and positions. Employers value interpersonal skills because they contribute to positive work environments and help maintain an efficient workflow. Here is a list of interpersonal skills for you to identify interpersonal skills you may possess that are valuable to employers: Active listening Active listening means listening to others with the purpose of gathering information and engaging with the speaker. Active listeners avoid distracting behaviors while in conversation with others. This can mean putting away or closing laptops or mobile devices while listening, and asking and answering questions when prompted. Dependability Dependable people can be relied on in any given situation. This can include anything from being punctual to keeping promises. Employers highly value dependable workers and trust them with important tasks and duties. Empathy A worker’s “emotional intelligence” is how well they understand the needs and feelings of others. Employers may hire empathetic or compassionate employees to create a positive, high-functioning workplace. Leadership Leadership is an important interpersonal skill that involves effective decision making. Effective leaders incorporate many other interpersonal skills, like empathy and patience, to make decisions. Leadership skills can be used by both managers and individual contributors. In any role, employers value people who take ownership to reach common goals. Teamwork The ability to work together as a team is extremely valuable in every workplace. Teamwork involves many other interpersonal skills like communication, active listening, flexibility and responsibility. Those who are good “team players” are often given important tasks in the workplace and may be seen as the good candidates for promotions. Jobs that require interpersonal skills Any job you apply for will require interpersonal skills of some kind. Some jobs that rely on strong interpersonal skills more than others include: Teachers Teachers need strong interpersonal skills in order to work collaboratively with each other, administrators, students and parents. An empathic and patient teacher can help students learn and grow effectively in their education. Administrative Assistants Administrative assistants need to be highly dependable, among other interpersonal skills. Administrative assistants also come in contact with customers or clients on a regular basis, making interpersonal skills a necessary function of the job. Registered Nurses Comfort and care for patients is a key skill for nurses. Interpersonal skills of all kinds are integral for the industry, especially empathy and patience. Marketing Managers Marketing requires several technical and soft skills. Interpersonal communications skills are an important part of marketing and marketing management, as marketing professionals not only work collaboratively in developing marketing campaigns but also with clients and sales teams. Customer Service Agents Customer service requires a high level of people skills. Those employed in customer service spend most of their work hours engaged with customers who may be frustrated, confused, or angry. Communication skills are necessary, especially patience, empathy and active listening. How to improve interpersonal skills While interpersonal skills can seem easy to practice as you interact with others on a daily basis, making a deliberate plan can help you quickly improve. Consider the following ways to improve your interpersonal skills: Attend workshops or online classes.  There are several workshops, online classes and videos on ways you can practice building interpersonal skills. While many are free, some are available at a cost. Seek out opportunities to build relationships.  If you work from home or do not otherwise have many opportunities to build interpersonal skills, you might consider joining a group. This could be related to your work like networking or industry-specific groups, or simply a group that shares a similar interest or hobby. Be thoughtful about ways your interactions could improve.  Take time to review the interactions you have and consider ways you could have interacted more effectively. This might be certain words you said, ways you reacted or body language you used. Ask trusted friends or colleagues for constructive criticism.  It is helpful to get a third-party perspective about your skill level and specific ways you can improve. Ask friends or trusted colleagues to provide constructive criticism regarding your interpersonal skills. Observe other positive interpersonal interactions.  It can also be helpful to learn by seeing others use interpersonal skills. Observe positive interactions of those around you and apply those qualities you admire to your own relationships. Seek out mentorship.  Asking someone you trust, admire and respect to counsel you on improving interpersonal skills and advancing in your career overall can be an extremely effective way to learn. Setting goals for yourself can also provide structure, making your learning more efficient by understanding when and how you have made adequate improvements. How to highlight interpersonal skills when applying for jobs During the job application and interview phase, you can highlight your interpersonal skills on your resume and your cover letter. After you are successfully hired, you should continue to maintain your skills and develop new ones. Including interpersonal skills on a resume On your resume, include a few key interpersonal skills under the “skills” section. Generally, the best skills to put on a resume are those that you are confident will be verified by any of the references you list on your job application. Review the job posting to understand which of your skills are most relevant to the job you’re applying for, and which you should prioritise on your resume. Your resume skills section may look like this: Technical skills:  POS Systems, Excel, HTML, Digital Phone Systems Additional skills:  Effective team player, highly communicative and cooperative, active listener, innovative researcher You can also provide examples of your interpersonal skills in the Experience section of your resume. Do this by including concrete examples of how you worked with others and the results you achieved. For example: “Collaborated with designers, copywriters and strategists on a rebranding initiative that resulted in a 30% increase in website visits.” Including interpersonal skills on a cover letter For your cover letter, you may want to focus on one strong, relevant interpersonal skill. This can help the employer get a good idea about an area you see as one of your strengths. You may also want to briefly explain how that skill can benefit the employer and create a good work relationship. An example section highlighting your skills in a cover letter could look like the following: “With my previous employer, I was often called upon to help form collaborative teams. My managers pointed to my ability to listen to and understand my colleagues’ strengths to best determine how to assign effective roles.” Related:  How to Write a Cover Letter Interpersonal skills in a job interview and on the job Your interpersonal skills will be necessary both during the job interview and on the job. During your job interview, the hiring manager may be looking to see how well you listen actively, maintain eye contact and whether you are courteous and respectful. The job interview is also a good opportunity to show dependability. Arriving early for your interview, for example, shows you are serious about the interview and respect the interviewer’s time. Related:  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression Once you successfully get a job, you will continue to rely on interpersonal skills. By demonstrating that you are dependable, taking the initiative to lead and having a positive impact on your colleagues, you can develop a strong reputation as a collaborative teammate. Interpersonal communication skills are increasingly valued by employers in every industry. Regardless of what type of career you are looking to enter, your ability to work well with your colleagues and employer may make a good impression and result in positive career growth.
  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression You have your job interview scheduled—congratulations! Now it’s time to prepare, and we’ve got you covered. In this article you’ll learn: How to practice your answers to interview questions Prepare your own questions for employers Make a great first impression What to bring to the interview Tips on good manners and body language How to win them over with your authenticity and positivity Practice strong answers In the days before your job interview, set aside time to do the following: Research the company so you can go into your interview with a solid understanding of the requirements of the job and how your background makes you a great fit.  Read company reviews  to learn more about the company culture and what others are saying about this employer.  Related:  The Complete Guide to Researching a Company Prepare your answer to the common question: “Tell me about yourself, and why are you interested in this role with our company?”. The idea is to quickly communicate who you are and what value you will bring to the company and the role.  Related:  Interview Question: “Tell Me About Yourself Re-read the job description. You may want to print it out and begin underlining specific skills the employer is looking for. Think about examples from your past and current work that align with these requirements. Prepare to be asked about times in the past when you used a specific skill and to tell stories with a clear  S ituation,  T ask,  A ction and  R esult. Writing out a few examples before the interview can help you respond with good quality answers.  Related:  How to Use the STAR Interview Response Technique Practise! Actually practising your answers out loud is an incredibly effective way to prepare. Say them to yourself or ask a friend to help run through questions and answers. Ask your friend for feedback in your answers. You’ll find you gain confidence as you get used to saying the words. Prepare smart questions Interviews are a two-way street. Employers expect you to ask questions: they want to know that you’re thinking seriously about what it would be like to work there. Here are some questions you may want to consider asking your interviewers: “Can you explain some of the day-to-day responsibilities for this job?” “How would you describe the characteristics of someone who would succeed in this role?” “If I were in this position, how would my performance be measured? How often?” “What departments does this team work with regularly? How do these departments typically collaborate? What does that process look like?” “What are the challenges you’re currently facing in your role?” Related:  Top 16 Interview Questions and Answers Think about first impressions Dress for the job you want. If you’re speaking to a recruiter before the interview, you can ask them about the dress code in the workplace and choose your outfit accordingly. If you don’t have someone to ask,  research the company  to learn what’s appropriate. Don’t forget the little things. Shine your shoes, make sure your nails are clean and tidy, and check your clothes for holes, stains, pet hair and loose threads. Brush your teeth and use floss. Plan your schedule so that you can arrive 10–15 minutes early. Map out your route to the interview location so you can be sure to arrive on time. Consider doing a trial run. If you’re taking public transportation, identify a backup plan if there are delays or closures. Pro-tip:  When you arrive early, use the extra minutes to observe the workplace dynamics. What to bring to the interview Set aside time before your interview to get the following items together. At least five copies of your printed resume on clean paper. While the hiring manager has likely seen your resume, they may not have read every line. Or you might be speaking with someone new. In either case, you might want to highlight specific accomplishments on your copy that you can discuss. A pen and a small notebook. Prepare to take notes, but not on your smartphone or any other electronic device. Write information down so that you can refer to these details in your follow-up thank you notes. Maintain eye contact as much as possible. A written version of the prepared questions for your interviewers. A single bag for all your materials. It’s easy to mistake nervous for disorganised, so keep all your documents in a single, multi-use messenger bag or portfolio. Make sure that it’s professional and appropriate to the corporate culture as well as your own style. Remember good manners and body language Non-verbal communication can be just as important as anything you say in the interview. Use confident, accessible body language. Smile frequently. Make eye contact when you’re speaking. Sit or stand tall with your shoulders back. Before the interview, take a deep breath and exhale slowly. This will help you manage any feelings of anxiety and will encourage greater self-confidence. Treat every single person you encounter with respect. This includes people on the road and in the parking lot, security personnel and front desk staff. Treat everyone you don’t know as though they’re the hiring manager. Even if they aren’t, your potential employer might ask for their feedback. Nail the handshake. During a job interview, the hiring manager (or person in seniority) should extend their hand first to initiate the handshake. Stand, look the person in the eye and smile. A good handshake should be firm but not crush the other person’s fingers. Send personalised thank you notes to each interviewer. You may want to ask for the business card of each person you speak with during the interview process so that you can follow up individually with a separate thank you email—if they don’t have a business card, you could ask for their email address and make a note of it. If you interviewed in the morning, send your follow-up emails the same day. If you are interviewed in the afternoon, the next morning is fine. Make certain that each email is distinct from the others, using the notes you took during the conversations.  Related:  Follow-up Email Examples for After the Interview Be authentic, concise and upbeat Respond truthfully to the questions you’re asked. Tie your answers back to your skills and accomplishments by providing examples of solutions and results you’ve achieved. If you cannot immediately think of an appropriate answer, say “Let me think of the best example to share,” pause as you collect your thoughts and then respond. Keep your answers short and focused, making sure that you actually answer the question you’ve been asked. Your time with each interviewer is limited so be mindful of rambling. Let your interviewer lead the conversation. Don’t speak negatively about current and former employers or colleagues. Companies want to hire problem solvers who overcome tough situations. If you’re feeling discouraged about your current job, focus on talking about what you’ve gained from that experience and what you want to do next.
  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression You have your job interview scheduled—congratulations! Now it’s time to prepare, and we’ve got you covered. In this article you’ll learn: How to practice your answers to interview questions Prepare your own questions for employers Make a great first impression What to bring to the interview Tips on good manners and body language How to win them over with your authenticity and positivity Practice strong answers In the days before your job interview, set aside time to do the following: Research the company so you can go into your interview with a solid understanding of the requirements of the job and how your background makes you a great fit.  Read company reviews  to learn more about the company culture and what others are saying about this employer.  Related:  The Complete Guide to Researching a Company Prepare your answer to the common question: “Tell me about yourself, and why are you interested in this role with our company?”. The idea is to quickly communicate who you are and what value you will bring to the company and the role.  Related:  Interview Question: “Tell Me About Yourself Re-read the job description. You may want to print it out and begin underlining specific skills the employer is looking for. Think about examples from your past and current work that align with these requirements. Prepare to be asked about times in the past when you used a specific skill and to tell stories with a clear  S ituation,  T ask,  A ction and  R esult. Writing out a few examples before the interview can help you respond with good quality answers.  Related:  How to Use the STAR Interview Response Technique Practise! Actually practising your answers out loud is an incredibly effective way to prepare. Say them to yourself or ask a friend to help run through questions and answers. Ask your friend for feedback in your answers. You’ll find you gain confidence as you get used to saying the words. Prepare smart questions Interviews are a two-way street. Employers expect you to ask questions: they want to know that you’re thinking seriously about what it would be like to work there. Here are some questions you may want to consider asking your interviewers: “Can you explain some of the day-to-day responsibilities for this job?” “How would you describe the characteristics of someone who would succeed in this role?” “If I were in this position, how would my performance be measured? How often?” “What departments does this team work with regularly? How do these departments typically collaborate? What does that process look like?” “What are the challenges you’re currently facing in your role?” Related:  Top 16 Interview Questions and Answers Think about first impressions Dress for the job you want. If you’re speaking to a recruiter before the interview, you can ask them about the dress code in the workplace and choose your outfit accordingly. If you don’t have someone to ask,  research the company  to learn what’s appropriate. Don’t forget the little things. Shine your shoes, make sure your nails are clean and tidy, and check your clothes for holes, stains, pet hair and loose threads. Brush your teeth and use floss. Plan your schedule so that you can arrive 10–15 minutes early. Map out your route to the interview location so you can be sure to arrive on time. Consider doing a trial run. If you’re taking public transportation, identify a backup plan if there are delays or closures. Pro-tip:  When you arrive early, use the extra minutes to observe the workplace dynamics. What to bring to the interview Set aside time before your interview to get the following items together. At least five copies of your printed resume on clean paper. While the hiring manager has likely seen your resume, they may not have read every line. Or you might be speaking with someone new. In either case, you might want to highlight specific accomplishments on your copy that you can discuss. A pen and a small notebook. Prepare to take notes, but not on your smartphone or any other electronic device. Write information down so that you can refer to these details in your follow-up thank you notes. Maintain eye contact as much as possible. A written version of the prepared questions for your interviewers. A single bag for all your materials. It’s easy to mistake nervous for disorganised, so keep all your documents in a single, multi-use messenger bag or portfolio. Make sure that it’s professional and appropriate to the corporate culture as well as your own style. Remember good manners and body language Non-verbal communication can be just as important as anything you say in the interview. Use confident, accessible body language. Smile frequently. Make eye contact when you’re speaking. Sit or stand tall with your shoulders back. Before the interview, take a deep breath and exhale slowly. This will help you manage any feelings of anxiety and will encourage greater self-confidence. Treat every single person you encounter with respect. This includes people on the road and in the parking lot, security personnel and front desk staff. Treat everyone you don’t know as though they’re the hiring manager. Even if they aren’t, your potential employer might ask for their feedback. Nail the handshake. During a job interview, the hiring manager (or person in seniority) should extend their hand first to initiate the handshake. Stand, look the person in the eye and smile. A good handshake should be firm but not crush the other person’s fingers. Send personalised thank you notes to each interviewer. You may want to ask for the business card of each person you speak with during the interview process so that you can follow up individually with a separate thank you email—if they don’t have a business card, you could ask for their email address and make a note of it. If you interviewed in the morning, send your follow-up emails the same day. If you are interviewed in the afternoon, the next morning is fine. Make certain that each email is distinct from the others, using the notes you took during the conversations.  Related:  Follow-up Email Examples for After the Interview Be authentic, concise and upbeat Respond truthfully to the questions you’re asked. Tie your answers back to your skills and accomplishments by providing examples of solutions and results you’ve achieved. If you cannot immediately think of an appropriate answer, say “Let me think of the best example to share,” pause as you collect your thoughts and then respond. Keep your answers short and focused, making sure that you actually answer the question you’ve been asked. Your time with each interviewer is limited so be mindful of rambling. Let your interviewer lead the conversation. Don’t speak negatively about current and former employers or colleagues. Companies want to hire problem solvers who overcome tough situations. If you’re feeling discouraged about your current job, focus on talking about what you’ve gained from that experience and what you want to do next.

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  Interpersonal skills involve the ability to communicate and build relationships with others. Often called “people skills,” they tend to incorporate both your innate personality traits and how you’ve learned to handle certain social situations. Effective interpersonal skills can help you during the job interview process and can have a positive impact on your career advancement. What are interpersonal skills? Interpersonal skills are traits you rely on when you interact and communicate with others. They cover a variety of scenarios where communication and cooperation are essential. Some examples of interpersonal skills include: Active listening Teamwork Responsibility Dependability Leadership Motivation Flexibility Patience Empathy In a work environment, strong interpersonal skills are an asset that can help you navigate complexity, change and day-to-day tasks. Why are interpersonal skills important? Strong interpersonal skills can help you during the job interview process as interviewers look for applicants who can work well with others. They will also help you succeed in almost any job by helping you understand other people and adjusting your approach to work together effectively. For example, while a software engineer may spend the majority of her time working on code independently, she may need to collaborate with other programmers to effectively bring a product to market. This is especially true as more companies implement collaborative agile frameworks for getting work done. Employers will be looking for workers who can both perform technical tasks with excellence and communicate well with colleagues. Interpersonal skills examples Unlike technical or “hard” skills, interpersonal skills are “soft” skills that are easily transferable across industries and positions. Employers value interpersonal skills because they contribute to positive work environments and help maintain an efficient workflow. Here is a list of interpersonal skills for you to identify interpersonal skills you may possess that are valuable to employers: Active listening Active listening means listening to others with the purpose of gathering information and engaging with the speaker. Active listeners avoid distracting behaviors while in conversation with others. This can mean putting away or closing laptops or mobile devices while listening, and asking and answering questions when prompted. Dependability Dependable people can be relied on in any given situation. This can include anything from being punctual to keeping promises. Employers highly value dependable workers and trust them with important tasks and duties. Empathy A worker’s “emotional intelligence” is how well they understand the needs and feelings of others. Employers may hire empathetic or compassionate employees to create a positive, high-functioning workplace. Leadership Leadership is an important interpersonal skill that involves effective decision making. Effective leaders incorporate many other interpersonal skills, like empathy and patience, to make decisions. Leadership skills can be used by both managers and individual contributors. In any role, employers value people who take ownership to reach common goals. Teamwork The ability to work together as a team is extremely valuable in every workplace. Teamwork involves many other interpersonal skills like communication, active listening, flexibility and responsibility. Those who are good “team players” are often given important tasks in the workplace and may be seen as the good candidates for promotions. Jobs that require interpersonal skills Any job you apply for will require interpersonal skills of some kind. Some jobs that rely on strong interpersonal skills more than others include: Teachers Teachers need strong interpersonal skills in order to work collaboratively with each other, administrators, students and parents. An empathic and patient teacher can help students learn and grow effectively in their education. Administrative Assistants Administrative assistants need to be highly dependable, among other interpersonal skills. Administrative assistants also come in contact with customers or clients on a regular basis, making interpersonal skills a necessary function of the job. Registered Nurses Comfort and care for patients is a key skill for nurses. Interpersonal skills of all kinds are integral for the industry, especially empathy and patience. Marketing Managers Marketing requires several technical and soft skills. Interpersonal communications skills are an important part of marketing and marketing management, as marketing professionals not only work collaboratively in developing marketing campaigns but also with clients and sales teams. Customer Service Agents Customer service requires a high level of people skills. Those employed in customer service spend most of their work hours engaged with customers who may be frustrated, confused, or angry. Communication skills are necessary, especially patience, empathy and active listening. How to improve interpersonal skills While interpersonal skills can seem easy to practice as you interact with others on a daily basis, making a deliberate plan can help you quickly improve. Consider the following ways to improve your interpersonal skills: Attend workshops or online classes.  There are several workshops, online classes and videos on ways you can practice building interpersonal skills. While many are free, some are available at a cost. Seek out opportunities to build relationships.  If you work from home or do not otherwise have many opportunities to build interpersonal skills, you might consider joining a group. This could be related to your work like networking or industry-specific groups, or simply a group that shares a similar interest or hobby. Be thoughtful about ways your interactions could improve.  Take time to review the interactions you have and consider ways you could have interacted more effectively. This might be certain words you said, ways you reacted or body language you used. Ask trusted friends or colleagues for constructive criticism.  It is helpful to get a third-party perspective about your skill level and specific ways you can improve. Ask friends or trusted colleagues to provide constructive criticism regarding your interpersonal skills. Observe other positive interpersonal interactions.  It can also be helpful to learn by seeing others use interpersonal skills. Observe positive interactions of those around you and apply those qualities you admire to your own relationships. Seek out mentorship.  Asking someone you trust, admire and respect to counsel you on improving interpersonal skills and advancing in your career overall can be an extremely effective way to learn. Setting goals for yourself can also provide structure, making your learning more efficient by understanding when and how you have made adequate improvements. How to highlight interpersonal skills when applying for jobs During the job application and interview phase, you can highlight your interpersonal skills on your resume and your cover letter. After you are successfully hired, you should continue to maintain your skills and develop new ones. Including interpersonal skills on a resume On your resume, include a few key interpersonal skills under the “skills” section. Generally, the best skills to put on a resume are those that you are confident will be verified by any of the references you list on your job application. Review the job posting to understand which of your skills are most relevant to the job you’re applying for, and which you should prioritise on your resume. Your resume skills section may look like this: Technical skills:  POS Systems, Excel, HTML, Digital Phone Systems Additional skills:  Effective team player, highly communicative and cooperative, active listener, innovative researcher You can also provide examples of your interpersonal skills in the Experience section of your resume. Do this by including concrete examples of how you worked with others and the results you achieved. For example: “Collaborated with designers, copywriters and strategists on a rebranding initiative that resulted in a 30% increase in website visits.” Including interpersonal skills on a cover letter For your cover letter, you may want to focus on one strong, relevant interpersonal skill. This can help the employer get a good idea about an area you see as one of your strengths. You may also want to briefly explain how that skill can benefit the employer and create a good work relationship. An example section highlighting your skills in a cover letter could look like the following: “With my previous employer, I was often called upon to help form collaborative teams. My managers pointed to my ability to listen to and understand my colleagues’ strengths to best determine how to assign effective roles.” Related:  How to Write a Cover Letter Interpersonal skills in a job interview and on the job Your interpersonal skills will be necessary both during the job interview and on the job. During your job interview, the hiring manager may be looking to see how well you listen actively, maintain eye contact and whether you are courteous and respectful. The job interview is also a good opportunity to show dependability. Arriving early for your interview, for example, shows you are serious about the interview and respect the interviewer’s time. Related:  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression Once you successfully get a job, you will continue to rely on interpersonal skills. By demonstrating that you are dependable, taking the initiative to lead and having a positive impact on your colleagues, you can develop a strong reputation as a collaborative teammate. Interpersonal communication skills are increasingly valued by employers in every industry. Regardless of what type of career you are looking to enter, your ability to work well with your colleagues and employer may make a good impression and result in positive career growth.
  Interpersonal skills involve the ability to communicate and build relationships with others. Often called “people skills,” they tend to incorporate both your innate personality traits and how you’ve learned to handle certain social situations. Effective interpersonal skills can help you during the job interview process and can have a positive impact on your career advancement. What are interpersonal skills? Interpersonal skills are traits you rely on when you interact and communicate with others. They cover a variety of scenarios where communication and cooperation are essential. Some examples of interpersonal skills include: Active listening Teamwork Responsibility Dependability Leadership Motivation Flexibility Patience Empathy In a work environment, strong interpersonal skills are an asset that can help you navigate complexity, change and day-to-day tasks. Why are interpersonal skills important? Strong interpersonal skills can help you during the job interview process as interviewers look for applicants who can work well with others. They will also help you succeed in almost any job by helping you understand other people and adjusting your approach to work together effectively. For example, while a software engineer may spend the majority of her time working on code independently, she may need to collaborate with other programmers to effectively bring a product to market. This is especially true as more companies implement collaborative agile frameworks for getting work done. Employers will be looking for workers who can both perform technical tasks with excellence and communicate well with colleagues. Interpersonal skills examples Unlike technical or “hard” skills, interpersonal skills are “soft” skills that are easily transferable across industries and positions. Employers value interpersonal skills because they contribute to positive work environments and help maintain an efficient workflow. Here is a list of interpersonal skills for you to identify interpersonal skills you may possess that are valuable to employers: Active listening Active listening means listening to others with the purpose of gathering information and engaging with the speaker. Active listeners avoid distracting behaviors while in conversation with others. This can mean putting away or closing laptops or mobile devices while listening, and asking and answering questions when prompted. Dependability Dependable people can be relied on in any given situation. This can include anything from being punctual to keeping promises. Employers highly value dependable workers and trust them with important tasks and duties. Empathy A worker’s “emotional intelligence” is how well they understand the needs and feelings of others. Employers may hire empathetic or compassionate employees to create a positive, high-functioning workplace. Leadership Leadership is an important interpersonal skill that involves effective decision making. Effective leaders incorporate many other interpersonal skills, like empathy and patience, to make decisions. Leadership skills can be used by both managers and individual contributors. In any role, employers value people who take ownership to reach common goals. Teamwork The ability to work together as a team is extremely valuable in every workplace. Teamwork involves many other interpersonal skills like communication, active listening, flexibility and responsibility. Those who are good “team players” are often given important tasks in the workplace and may be seen as the good candidates for promotions. Jobs that require interpersonal skills Any job you apply for will require interpersonal skills of some kind. Some jobs that rely on strong interpersonal skills more than others include: Teachers Teachers need strong interpersonal skills in order to work collaboratively with each other, administrators, students and parents. An empathic and patient teacher can help students learn and grow effectively in their education. Administrative Assistants Administrative assistants need to be highly dependable, among other interpersonal skills. Administrative assistants also come in contact with customers or clients on a regular basis, making interpersonal skills a necessary function of the job. Registered Nurses Comfort and care for patients is a key skill for nurses. Interpersonal skills of all kinds are integral for the industry, especially empathy and patience. Marketing Managers Marketing requires several technical and soft skills. Interpersonal communications skills are an important part of marketing and marketing management, as marketing professionals not only work collaboratively in developing marketing campaigns but also with clients and sales teams. Customer Service Agents Customer service requires a high level of people skills. Those employed in customer service spend most of their work hours engaged with customers who may be frustrated, confused, or angry. Communication skills are necessary, especially patience, empathy and active listening. How to improve interpersonal skills While interpersonal skills can seem easy to practice as you interact with others on a daily basis, making a deliberate plan can help you quickly improve. Consider the following ways to improve your interpersonal skills: Attend workshops or online classes.  There are several workshops, online classes and videos on ways you can practice building interpersonal skills. While many are free, some are available at a cost. Seek out opportunities to build relationships.  If you work from home or do not otherwise have many opportunities to build interpersonal skills, you might consider joining a group. This could be related to your work like networking or industry-specific groups, or simply a group that shares a similar interest or hobby. Be thoughtful about ways your interactions could improve.  Take time to review the interactions you have and consider ways you could have interacted more effectively. This might be certain words you said, ways you reacted or body language you used. Ask trusted friends or colleagues for constructive criticism.  It is helpful to get a third-party perspective about your skill level and specific ways you can improve. Ask friends or trusted colleagues to provide constructive criticism regarding your interpersonal skills. Observe other positive interpersonal interactions.  It can also be helpful to learn by seeing others use interpersonal skills. Observe positive interactions of those around you and apply those qualities you admire to your own relationships. Seek out mentorship.  Asking someone you trust, admire and respect to counsel you on improving interpersonal skills and advancing in your career overall can be an extremely effective way to learn. Setting goals for yourself can also provide structure, making your learning more efficient by understanding when and how you have made adequate improvements. How to highlight interpersonal skills when applying for jobs During the job application and interview phase, you can highlight your interpersonal skills on your resume and your cover letter. After you are successfully hired, you should continue to maintain your skills and develop new ones. Including interpersonal skills on a resume On your resume, include a few key interpersonal skills under the “skills” section. Generally, the best skills to put on a resume are those that you are confident will be verified by any of the references you list on your job application. Review the job posting to understand which of your skills are most relevant to the job you’re applying for, and which you should prioritise on your resume. Your resume skills section may look like this: Technical skills:  POS Systems, Excel, HTML, Digital Phone Systems Additional skills:  Effective team player, highly communicative and cooperative, active listener, innovative researcher You can also provide examples of your interpersonal skills in the Experience section of your resume. Do this by including concrete examples of how you worked with others and the results you achieved. For example: “Collaborated with designers, copywriters and strategists on a rebranding initiative that resulted in a 30% increase in website visits.” Including interpersonal skills on a cover letter For your cover letter, you may want to focus on one strong, relevant interpersonal skill. This can help the employer get a good idea about an area you see as one of your strengths. You may also want to briefly explain how that skill can benefit the employer and create a good work relationship. An example section highlighting your skills in a cover letter could look like the following: “With my previous employer, I was often called upon to help form collaborative teams. My managers pointed to my ability to listen to and understand my colleagues’ strengths to best determine how to assign effective roles.” Related:  How to Write a Cover Letter Interpersonal skills in a job interview and on the job Your interpersonal skills will be necessary both during the job interview and on the job. During your job interview, the hiring manager may be looking to see how well you listen actively, maintain eye contact and whether you are courteous and respectful. The job interview is also a good opportunity to show dependability. Arriving early for your interview, for example, shows you are serious about the interview and respect the interviewer’s time. Related:  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression Once you successfully get a job, you will continue to rely on interpersonal skills. By demonstrating that you are dependable, taking the initiative to lead and having a positive impact on your colleagues, you can develop a strong reputation as a collaborative teammate. Interpersonal communication skills are increasingly valued by employers in every industry. Regardless of what type of career you are looking to enter, your ability to work well with your colleagues and employer may make a good impression and result in positive career growth.

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  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression You have your job interview scheduled—congratulations! Now it’s time to prepare, and we’ve got you covered. In this article you’ll learn: How to practice your answers to interview questions Prepare your own questions for employers Make a great first impression What to bring to the interview Tips on good manners and body language How to win them over with your authenticity and positivity Practice strong answers In the days before your job interview, set aside time to do the following: Research the company so you can go into your interview with a solid understanding of the requirements of the job and how your background makes you a great fit.  Read company reviews  to learn more about the company culture and what others are saying about this employer.  Related:  The Complete Guide to Researching a Company Prepare your answer to the common question: “Tell me about yourself, and why are you interested in this role with our company?”. The idea is to quickly communicate who you are and what value you will bring to the company and the role.  Related:  Interview Question: “Tell Me About Yourself Re-read the job description. You may want to print it out and begin underlining specific skills the employer is looking for. Think about examples from your past and current work that align with these requirements. Prepare to be asked about times in the past when you used a specific skill and to tell stories with a clear  S ituation,  T ask,  A ction and  R esult. Writing out a few examples before the interview can help you respond with good quality answers.  Related:  How to Use the STAR Interview Response Technique Practise! Actually practising your answers out loud is an incredibly effective way to prepare. Say them to yourself or ask a friend to help run through questions and answers. Ask your friend for feedback in your answers. You’ll find you gain confidence as you get used to saying the words. Prepare smart questions Interviews are a two-way street. Employers expect you to ask questions: they want to know that you’re thinking seriously about what it would be like to work there. Here are some questions you may want to consider asking your interviewers: “Can you explain some of the day-to-day responsibilities for this job?” “How would you describe the characteristics of someone who would succeed in this role?” “If I were in this position, how would my performance be measured? How often?” “What departments does this team work with regularly? How do these departments typically collaborate? What does that process look like?” “What are the challenges you’re currently facing in your role?” Related:  Top 16 Interview Questions and Answers Think about first impressions Dress for the job you want. If you’re speaking to a recruiter before the interview, you can ask them about the dress code in the workplace and choose your outfit accordingly. If you don’t have someone to ask,  research the company  to learn what’s appropriate. Don’t forget the little things. Shine your shoes, make sure your nails are clean and tidy, and check your clothes for holes, stains, pet hair and loose threads. Brush your teeth and use floss. Plan your schedule so that you can arrive 10–15 minutes early. Map out your route to the interview location so you can be sure to arrive on time. Consider doing a trial run. If you’re taking public transportation, identify a backup plan if there are delays or closures. Pro-tip:  When you arrive early, use the extra minutes to observe the workplace dynamics. What to bring to the interview Set aside time before your interview to get the following items together. At least five copies of your printed resume on clean paper. While the hiring manager has likely seen your resume, they may not have read every line. Or you might be speaking with someone new. In either case, you might want to highlight specific accomplishments on your copy that you can discuss. A pen and a small notebook. Prepare to take notes, but not on your smartphone or any other electronic device. Write information down so that you can refer to these details in your follow-up thank you notes. Maintain eye contact as much as possible. A written version of the prepared questions for your interviewers. A single bag for all your materials. It’s easy to mistake nervous for disorganised, so keep all your documents in a single, multi-use messenger bag or portfolio. Make sure that it’s professional and appropriate to the corporate culture as well as your own style. Remember good manners and body language Non-verbal communication can be just as important as anything you say in the interview. Use confident, accessible body language. Smile frequently. Make eye contact when you’re speaking. Sit or stand tall with your shoulders back. Before the interview, take a deep breath and exhale slowly. This will help you manage any feelings of anxiety and will encourage greater self-confidence. Treat every single person you encounter with respect. This includes people on the road and in the parking lot, security personnel and front desk staff. Treat everyone you don’t know as though they’re the hiring manager. Even if they aren’t, your potential employer might ask for their feedback. Nail the handshake. During a job interview, the hiring manager (or person in seniority) should extend their hand first to initiate the handshake. Stand, look the person in the eye and smile. A good handshake should be firm but not crush the other person’s fingers. Send personalised thank you notes to each interviewer. You may want to ask for the business card of each person you speak with during the interview process so that you can follow up individually with a separate thank you email—if they don’t have a business card, you could ask for their email address and make a note of it. If you interviewed in the morning, send your follow-up emails the same day. If you are interviewed in the afternoon, the next morning is fine. Make certain that each email is distinct from the others, using the notes you took during the conversations.  Related:  Follow-up Email Examples for After the Interview Be authentic, concise and upbeat Respond truthfully to the questions you’re asked. Tie your answers back to your skills and accomplishments by providing examples of solutions and results you’ve achieved. If you cannot immediately think of an appropriate answer, say “Let me think of the best example to share,” pause as you collect your thoughts and then respond. Keep your answers short and focused, making sure that you actually answer the question you’ve been asked. Your time with each interviewer is limited so be mindful of rambling. Let your interviewer lead the conversation. Don’t speak negatively about current and former employers or colleagues. Companies want to hire problem solvers who overcome tough situations. If you’re feeling discouraged about your current job, focus on talking about what you’ve gained from that experience and what you want to do next.
  Job Interview Tips: How to Make a Great Impression You have your job interview scheduled—congratulations! Now it’s time to prepare, and we’ve got you covered. In this article you’ll learn: How to practice your answers to interview questions Prepare your own questions for employers Make a great first impression What to bring to the interview Tips on good manners and body language How to win them over with your authenticity and positivity Practice strong answers In the days before your job interview, set aside time to do the following: Research the company so you can go into your interview with a solid understanding of the requirements of the job and how your background makes you a great fit.  Read company reviews  to learn more about the company culture and what others are saying about this employer.  Related:  The Complete Guide to Researching a Company Prepare your answer to the common question: “Tell me about yourself, and why are you interested in this role with our company?”. The idea is to quickly communicate who you are and what value you will bring to the company and the role.  Related:  Interview Question: “Tell Me About Yourself Re-read the job description. You may want to print it out and begin underlining specific skills the employer is looking for. Think about examples from your past and current work that align with these requirements. Prepare to be asked about times in the past when you used a specific skill and to tell stories with a clear  S ituation,  T ask,  A ction and  R esult. Writing out a few examples before the interview can help you respond with good quality answers.  Related:  How to Use the STAR Interview Response Technique Practise! Actually practising your answers out loud is an incredibly effective way to prepare. Say them to yourself or ask a friend to help run through questions and answers. Ask your friend for feedback in your answers. You’ll find you gain confidence as you get used to saying the words. Prepare smart questions Interviews are a two-way street. Employers expect you to ask questions: they want to know that you’re thinking seriously about what it would be like to work there. Here are some questions you may want to consider asking your interviewers: “Can you explain some of the day-to-day responsibilities for this job?” “How would you describe the characteristics of someone who would succeed in this role?” “If I were in this position, how would my performance be measured? How often?” “What departments does this team work with regularly? How do these departments typically collaborate? What does that process look like?” “What are the challenges you’re currently facing in your role?” Related:  Top 16 Interview Questions and Answers Think about first impressions Dress for the job you want. If you’re speaking to a recruiter before the interview, you can ask them about the dress code in the workplace and choose your outfit accordingly. If you don’t have someone to ask,  research the company  to learn what’s appropriate. Don’t forget the little things. Shine your shoes, make sure your nails are clean and tidy, and check your clothes for holes, stains, pet hair and loose threads. Brush your teeth and use floss. Plan your schedule so that you can arrive 10–15 minutes early. Map out your route to the interview location so you can be sure to arrive on time. Consider doing a trial run. If you’re taking public transportation, identify a backup plan if there are delays or closures. Pro-tip:  When you arrive early, use the extra minutes to observe the workplace dynamics. What to bring to the interview Set aside time before your interview to get the following items together. At least five copies of your printed resume on clean paper. While the hiring manager has likely seen your resume, they may not have read every line. Or you might be speaking with someone new. In either case, you might want to highlight specific accomplishments on your copy that you can discuss. A pen and a small notebook. Prepare to take notes, but not on your smartphone or any other electronic device. Write information down so that you can refer to these details in your follow-up thank you notes. Maintain eye contact as much as possible. A written version of the prepared questions for your interviewers. A single bag for all your materials. It’s easy to mistake nervous for disorganised, so keep all your documents in a single, multi-use messenger bag or portfolio. Make sure that it’s professional and appropriate to the corporate culture as well as your own style. Remember good manners and body language Non-verbal communication can be just as important as anything you say in the interview. Use confident, accessible body language. Smile frequently. Make eye contact when you’re speaking. Sit or stand tall with your shoulders back. Before the interview, take a deep breath and exhale slowly. This will help you manage any feelings of anxiety and will encourage greater self-confidence. Treat every single person you encounter with respect. This includes people on the road and in the parking lot, security personnel and front desk staff. Treat everyone you don’t know as though they’re the hiring manager. Even if they aren’t, your potential employer might ask for their feedback. Nail the handshake. During a job interview, the hiring manager (or person in seniority) should extend their hand first to initiate the handshake. Stand, look the person in the eye and smile. A good handshake should be firm but not crush the other person’s fingers. Send personalised thank you notes to each interviewer. You may want to ask for the business card of each person you speak with during the interview process so that you can follow up individually with a separate thank you email—if they don’t have a business card, you could ask for their email address and make a note of it. If you interviewed in the morning, send your follow-up emails the same day. If you are interviewed in the afternoon, the next morning is fine. Make certain that each email is distinct from the others, using the notes you took during the conversations.  Related:  Follow-up Email Examples for After the Interview Be authentic, concise and upbeat Respond truthfully to the questions you’re asked. Tie your answers back to your skills and accomplishments by providing examples of solutions and results you’ve achieved. If you cannot immediately think of an appropriate answer, say “Let me think of the best example to share,” pause as you collect your thoughts and then respond. Keep your answers short and focused, making sure that you actually answer the question you’ve been asked. Your time with each interviewer is limited so be mindful of rambling. Let your interviewer lead the conversation. Don’t speak negatively about current and former employers or colleagues. Companies want to hire problem solvers who overcome tough situations. If you’re feeling discouraged about your current job, focus on talking about what you’ve gained from that experience and what you want to do next.

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How to stretch your salary like a pro We have all been there. We have all found ourselves without a cent in our pockets on the last days of the month, yet we never seem to know where all the money went to. In a world where the  global  economy deteriorates more and more each day, everyone should know how to manage their money in an efficient manner. It does not matter the amount of money we make, if we know how to manage it, we will be able to stretch it without being financial experts. Is this really possible? The secret to saving money is –pause for dramatic effect- establishing priorities. But how do we know what to give priority to? If your hard-earned money is vanishing at the end of the month like magic, it is time to sit down and evaluate your expenses once and for all. Planning has to become a monthly or even a daily routine for messy spenders. First of all, there are three things that must be taken into account: income, debt, and expenses. The easiest part is establishing our income, the rest will be like seeing our worst nightmares come true, but it will be over soon. No one actually likes knowing how much money they spend each month, but the good thing about planning is that we can figure out how not to bleed out our bank accounts each month and maybe even save up to a 10% for that beach trip you are dying to take. The experts have spoken, and they recommend we divide our income this way: 30-35% for living expenses (including utilities). 16-20% for food and groceries. Invest 17-19% in transportation (including insurance, gas and public transportation). 5-7% for clothes and services (including dry-cleaning, washing, and drying). Invest 5-9% in health (insurance, pharmacy expenses, etc.). 3-6% for entertainment (it cannot be all work and no play). Save 2% - 10%. For miscellaneous expenses like newspapers, education, personal grooming, contributions, etc. destine about 7% to 12% depending on your other expenses. Once we have a clear vision of where our money is going, it will definitely be easier to organize and follow our parameters each month, until we get a constant flow on our bank accounts. There are thousands of useful apps to help us get our prioritizing on (Daily Budget for iPhone, for example), but the most important thing is taking that first step towards economic stability. All we have to do is reach out and take it.
Getting a job using your second language Knowing other languages in a world that, thanks to globalization, has forced people to be bilingual and almost makes them forget their mother tongue, definitely, comes in handy when looking for a new job. Numbers do not lie, today, nearly 60% of job offers require the candidate to master a second language. English and German are taking the lead on the list for the most popular languages required by employers, especially in the areas of engineering, finance, new technologies, and health. However, according to recent surveys from Adecco,  infoempleo  and the Center for Sociological Research (CIS) in Spain, five languages will prevail among job seekers in 2016. To our surprise, these languages are Italian, Portuguese, German, French, and the ever-present English.  An astounding 89.5% of current job offers require a second language, so it is time to get enrolled in the language course of your choice. French is on the list due to the fact that it is the official language of over 30 countries and as one of the five official languages in the United Nations; it also stands out in the touristic and pharmaceutical areas. German — or Europe’s second most spoken language—, stands out in the tourism sector, as well as those languages mentioned above. Perhaps the most shocking fact about this list is to see the “nonna’s” mother tongue on it. Italian has had an impressive boom these last years in Europe, especially in Spain. Brazil’s peak as a first-power economy in Latin America led them to appear in this list and the fact that it is the official language in six countries. The near future looks very promising for Portuguese. Do we really need to say something more to convince you to go ahead and learn a second language? If you need a little extra motivation, Laura Centeno, Country Manager for People Working, indicates that a bilingual person could earn 20% more than those who speak only one language.

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